Spring

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8 thoughts on “Spring

    • Thank you! Pear blossoms. We’ve also got maybe three ancient cherry trees that still bloom and bear, as well as one equally old apple tree that sometimes blooms and sometimes bears fruit. Three fifty year-old grape vines along the back fence-row feed the deer and birds.

    • Yeah, it is. I’ve also got to rake, run the line-trimmer, and mow for the first time this season, then wash the cars. I’m probably going to get another floatation bag for the stern. All four of the bags I bought from Folbot were faulty – seams were not properly heat-sealed, so leak air. I’ve got a tapered drybag/floatation bag for the bow that works very well, and I think I’ll get another just like it. That E68 has an excessively long stern. I think the shoulder is probably well enough that I can get out on the water for some easy paddling now.

  1. We’re thinking of planting a couple of fruit trees – cherry and lemon. Those are trees known to produce pretty hearty yields. I’m rather tired of all the work of planting a vegetable patch and getting only enough yield for a couple of dinner salads and 3000 loaves of zucchini bread (I hate zucchini!). Tomatoes are the best to grow, but Paul’s deathly allergic to them. So we’ve pretty much decided to limit ourselves to our herb garden and adding a couple more fruit trees. (We do have a little mandarin tree, but it has yet to so much as flower. Maybe this will be the year it does something.)

    Glad to hear your shoulder is improving.

    Our lilac is promising to go mad this season, for the first time since I’ve lived here. Last year it had two blossoms, the year before that not a one.

  2. For that orange tree, try getting another mandarin to plant across the yard from it. Do they have sexes? Maybe one of the opposite sex will provoke a flowering.

    Unless you’re starving, you can only eat so much zuchinni bread. I does make a good vegetarian lasagna substitute for meat. With Paul’s allergy, I’m guessing you guys don’t eat much Italian food?

    The birds will fight you for the cherries when they are ripe.

  3. I make Alfredo and occasionally a pesto sauce. I love Italian food, but really burnt out on the red sauces years ago when I was married to my kids’ dad. He’s Italian and we spent about half our married years living with his Italian mother. She made a giant pot of tomato sauce every Sunday and we ate it with just about every meal – Mostaciolli, baked mostaciolli, lasagne, pizza, stuffed shells, meatball sandwiches….you get the idea. But I never had an Alfredo or Pesto sauce in those years, not once. What I do miss are sun-dried tomatoes. Paul doesn’t seem to be that wild about Italian food. But he doesn’t like to eat pasta more than twice a week. He does miss pizza. They make those with white sauce now, but it’s just not the same.

    Thanks for the cross pollination suggestion. I hadn’t thought of that. There may be some other citrus trees in the neighborhood, but not in our yard. Would I have to worry about the mandarins cross-pollinating with a lemon tree? As for the cherries and the birds, there are quite a lot of cherries around. The birds don’t seem to be too big a problem. Plus, our neighborhood crawls with cats.

    We planted a grape vine last summer, but don’t expect anything from it for quite a while. I’m encouraged, though, that it survived it’s first winter.

    • Egad. I hadn’t thought about the possibility of your mandarin orange tree mating with a lemon tree. That’d be horrible, unless it resulted in sweet lemons, but I think sour is the dominant gene. Truth be told, however, I know nothing about plants. I came up with the suggestion based on our planting a small apple tree a couple of years ago across the yard from our very old apple tree. Both bloomed like I’d never seen trees bloom before, but the frost the following week and subsequent drought killed the smaller tree. Very sad. The old tree mourned.

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