Church-Hopping

My wife says she thinks we will get a reputation for church-hopping.  We’ve recently left a congregation we’d associated with for about the past nine years and where I’d served as a Sunday School teacher, elder and sort of co-pastor, and where my wife had played keyboard.  Before that, we’d been part of another congregation where my wife and I had both taught Sunday School and where I’d served as a deacon.  Dunno, maybe anything shy of 20 years with the same congregation indicates instability vis-a-vis ability to build and maintain relationships with other members of a congregation as well as relative to congregational authority and government.  I can see a case for that.

On the other hand, there’s discernment and a freedom, within the Body of Christ, to exercise discernment in regard to leadership trends and changes in what’s considered acceptable.  Also, there’re choices mandated by conscience as one develops biblical categories to make sense of behaviors, statements, trends, and other circumstances or conceptual “currents” that may push against and enswirl Christians in a local congregation.

24-life-in-stream

Something I try to teach those of my clients who are more artistically minded is this:

  • If you’re going to color inside the lines, try to ensure
  • they’re lines you’ve drawn, yourself, or
  • they’re lines that make rational sense to you.

Too often within a religious context we fail to exercise our competence to make sense of what we see, what we hear and what we experience.  The “wolves” the scriptures warn about take advantage of that tendency and often succeed in bringing the local congregation under their own authority creating categories of behavior and contribution to the wolf’s own well-being that are substituted for scripturally grounded Christian faith and practice.  That, in spite of the fact that the scriptures of Old and New Testament never once adjure the elect to pretend about anything.  It was Christ who said, “You shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.”

Back to the Christov-Tenn church-hopping family – during the past several weeks, we’ve visited with four different congregations.  One of them, last week, I attended solo as my wife and son were out of town.  My wife told me, “You can visit that one by yourself.”  Turns out she was right about that one.  Today, we plan to return to a nearby church we’ve already been to and see what their Sunday School classes are like.  After this congregation, we’ve got one other we plan to visit with.  And who knows?  Maybe we will become aware of some others we should also visit.

Friends Far Away

This morning, I got up early so I could get to the gym before first light.  Another weekend with crap weather – rain.  We’ve had A LOT of rain here in Southern Middle Tennessee this year.  Last week – Monday through Friday – was mostly sunny with temperatures not super cold.  But most weekends, we’ve had rain.  That’s what is expected again this weekend – more rain.

I didn’t make it to the gym this morning, though.  After paying a bill online, I checked my email and read an email update from the Gibello family.  I’ve mentioned them before on this site.  My son still asks about them and remembers their visit and their camper trailer, which he thought was pretty cool.  My wife and I agreed to make what for us is a fairly large, one-time donation (in addition to our small monthly commitment) because while we’re looking for a congregation to worship with, we’re not doing regular local-church giving.

Friends from the Chattanooga area are coming up to visit this afternoon and when my son woke up this morning, he talked about the Gibello family, confusing them with the family that’s actually spending the afternoon with us.  Odd, huh?  I hadn’t mentioned that I’d just been reading Melissa’s blog posts from her journal.  My son enjoyed looking at the photos of life in PNG, thought the stilt house was cool, thought using a leaf-hut outhouse might be problematic, and he thought having a large river near the house would be “kind of creepy, actually.”