Life is for Living

As has been the case for the last two or three years, I’ve been busier and more interested in living life with my family than I have been in writing about it.  Here’s a little of what’s been going on:

A New Bike for 76

Last Thursday, I picked up a 2005 Gary Fisher Tarpon from a Craigslist seller for my son.  He outgrew and sold off his 1990s Giant Talon 7-speed mountain bike a couple of years ago and I’ve kept the money from that to go toward a new bike.  We tried to sell on Craigslist his 1970s Columbia Challenger in ride-able, original condition but got not even one query.  I convinced my son to donate the bike to a local bicycle club’s “reCycle” program for needy kids and told him I’d combine the value of that bike with the money from the Giant.  The Tarpon cost $65 – about 20 dollars over Bicycle Blue-Book’s valuation for an ’05 Tarpon in excellent condition, but the the bike was in such good shape I wasn’t going to insult the seller by offering less than 1/3 his asking price.  At $65, the bike came in well under the $327 the original dealer receipt indicated the seller paid in 2005.

Boy's Road Bicycle

1970’s Columbia Challenger – above.

76's-Mtn-Bike

2005 Gary Fisher Tarpon – yes, I have the original seat and plan to clean it up and install it if my son decides he hates the strange, spongy seat that’s on the bike, now.

Mother’s Day Breakfast

I haven’t really learned how to cook, but I can scramble eggs and am trying to learn how to make an omelet.  I usually arise on the weekends before dawn and head to the gym, then return to the house before my family is awake and make some kind of breakfast – scrambled eggs and tortillas with salsa, for instance.  On Mother’s Day, this year, I prepared a breakfast for my wife and son consisting of scrambled eggs, sausage patties, and biscuits.  I know, three things, right?  I was able to manage preparation times so that I cleaned up as I cooked and had everything on the table at about the same time.  Family was happy with my efforts, so I’ve done this two or three times since.

Mother's-Day-Breakfast

Water Snake – Poisonous? Probably

Sometime close to Mother’s day, my son and I rode a local greenway and, while looking at a creek from a low bridge saw this snake.  We saw a couple of others that day, as well.

Water-Snake

Theis Holsters

For the sake of comfort, I wish we lived in a society where open-carry was the norm.  That said, Theis Holsters serve as a relatively comfortable inside-the-waistband means to concealed-carry my pistols.  I purchased the basic leather version – EZ Clip for my FNS-9c and the Single Clip for my Glock 42.

Theis-Holsters

Lunchtime Rides Continue

Since the weather’s dried up a bit – and it was about the wettest autumn and winter I can recall here in Southern Middle Tennessee – I’ve been keeping the Miyata 610 at the office and riding 3-5 miles during my lunch hours maybe three or four days a week.  Here’s the uphill view from one of the routes I take:

Lunchtime-Ride-Late-May

Pistols for Everyday Use

It’s true, and you probably already knew this – I like firearms and have enjoyed plinking since I was kid.  Following my Astra Constable debacle, I’ve acquired yet another Walther PP “clone” – a FEG PA63 in .380 caliber, a Glock 42, and an FNS-9c.  Additionally, I’ve also discovered what I thought was my FN Browning M1900 is actually an “Asian” or Chinese copy possibly manufactured in the 1920s or 1930s in a warlord’s armory.

High Standard Supermatic Flite-King

With weighted barrel, this .22 LR pistol is a joy to shoot – close to zero recoil and not much report.

High-Standard-Flite-King

Walther PPK & Kel-Tec P32

These are two pistols I’ve carried at various times.  The P32 is great for bicycling and kayaking but was defective upon purchase and required warranty work.  Since the factory repairs, it’s been 100 percent reliable.  The Walther I have been keeping locked away now that I’ve got other, less irreplaceable options.

Walther-PPK-&-Kel-Tec-P32

FEG PA63 .380

I traded an older pistol that looked like it’d spent 50 years at the bottom of a well after having exhumed from a roadside ditch.  The PA63 is an accurate pistol and reliably cycles even antique ammunition.  As a bonus, it fits in a couple of my PPK holsters and I have a lot of .380 ammunition.

PA63-Leftside

PA63-Rightside

Glock 42

I traded, at considerable loss, my Astra Constable toward this Glock 42 back in June of last year.  The Glock malfunctions every round using the lower power, antique Peters and the modern PPU ammunition, however the antique Western Ammunition Service ammo induces no malfunctions.  The Glock also reliably cycles Buffalo Bore +P ammunition, which is what I keep in the magazine.

Glock-42-w-Antique-&-Modern-Ammo

FNS-9c, Anniversary Edition

Caution-Lady, my wife, picked out a ring with a lot of small diamonds in it to celebrate our 20th wedding anniversary.  What I wanted was a Walther P99 in 9×19, but I was unable to locate one at a price I was willing to pay around the same time as I bought my wife her new ring.  What I did find, and it felt like a kind of consolation prize, was a used FNS-9c.  After I bought it, I learned that FNH America has issued a voluntary recall on the FNS series.  I ordered Theis EZ-Clip holster for 9c and sent it back to the factory for service.  The holster arrived a couple of days before the pistol was returned.  Here are a couple of pictures of the weapon holstered – the first is all Pinteresty-looking.  Yes, the staged image is my attempt at a joke.  The second’s just a picture.

FNS-9c-&-Theis-Holster-Devotional-Image

FNS-9c-&Theis-EZ-Clip-Closeup

About the FNS-9c – it’s the only semi-automatic pistol I own that’s not malfunctioned due to cheap practice ammo or operator error.  I’ve fired close to 500 rounds of mixed quality inexpensive range ammunition and 41 rounds of good quality self-defense ammunition.  While it is not as aesthetically pleasing as a Walther P99c, the FNS-9c is a pistol I shoot accurately with confidence in its reliability.  I’m glad I’ve got it.

FNS-9c-17-Magazine